Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin (SCIg) Therapy General Information

pdfASCIA PCC SCIg General information 2021260.85 KB

Immunoglobulins (commonly known as antibodies) are used to treat adults and children with primary immune deficiencies (and other medical conditions), who are unable to make enough of their own antibodies, or who have antibodies that don’t work properly. 

Replacing these antibodies helps to protect against infection and can prevent long term damage from ongoing infections (such as chronic lung disease).

How are SCIg infusions given?

Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) infusions are given by slowly injecting purified immunoglobulin into fatty tissue just underneath the skin.

SCIg can be given at home using:

  • Mechanical infusion pumps - spring loaded, or battery powered.
  • Rapid push - a manual method that does not require a pump, with the infusion pushed by hand through a syringe.

What are the risks associated with SCIg?

SCIg is very well tolerated and safe. SCIg is made from plasma (the liquid part of blood), which comes from blood donors who are checked to make sure they are healthy and do not have certain infectious diseases.

Manufacturers also include steps in the processing of blood or plasma that inactivate or remove viruses. 

This means that there is an extremely low (almost zero) chance of blood borne viruses, such as Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, HIV and Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (also called “mad cow disease”).   

Reactions or side effects to SCIg include:

  • Common injection site reactions such as redness, swelling and itching These are usually mild and go away over a day or two. Reactions are generally worse with the first few infusions and get better over time. Most itching is resolved by slowing the infusion.

  • Uncommon side effects such as headache, feeling hot, nausea, diarrhoea, sore throat, rash, increased cough and back pain. These are usually mild.

  • Extremely rare and serious side effects such as allergic reactions, kidney problems or blood clots.

If a reaction occurs you must inform your nurse specialist or doctor as soon as possible and get advice before having any more infusions.

For information about managing reactions see pages 6 and 7 of this document.

What needs to be done before starting SCIg?

Before you start on SCIg, your nurse specialist will provide you with information and training on how to give SCIg at home.

You will need to sign a consent form to say that you understand the need for treatment and the chance of reactions that may occur with the treatment. 

Choosing a SCIg infusion site

Infusion sitesUsing the same site for infusions can help reduce the amount of local swelling and redness that can occur after an infusion.

However, multiple (2-3) sites can be used on a rotating basis, according to patient preference.

SCIg injection sites are usually in the lower abdomen, but the outer edge of the thigh, buttocks or back of the upper arm can also be used.

Avoid bony areas such as the hips.

When using the lower abdomen in adults and most children, the needle should be inserted at least 5cm away from the belly button.

If using more than one site at a time, make sure they are at least 5cm apart.

Note: Do not insert the needle where the skin is scarred, bruised, broken or inflamed (such as eczema).

Before you infuse, have your equipment ready: see checklist www.allergy.org.au/patients/immunodeficiencies/scig-therapy-equipment-checklist

An infusion checklist is also available www.allergy.org.au/patients/immunodeficiencies/scig-infusion-checklist

It is recommended you have a cold pack, a non-drowsy antihistamine and an analgesic (pain medication) available in case of a mild reaction.

Examples of SCIg infusions are shown below.

SCig infusion   SCig infusion

Documenting the SCIg infusion

The details of each infusion session must be recorded in a SCIg Infusion diary. Your nurse specialist or doctor will give you a SCIg infusion diary and will explain the information you will need to record.

Completed diaries must be available for review by your nurse specialist or doctor at each outpatient clinic visit.

Ordering, collection, transport and storage of SCIg

  • ASCIA SCIg Treatment PlanMake sure you order SCIg product in advance - follow your SCIg treatment plan.
  • Your nurse specialist or doctor will explain how and where to collect the SCIg product and this should be included in your SCIg treatment plan.
  • SCIg must be kept cool (2-8°C) for the journey home:

scig tick When collecting SCIg you must provide a cool box or cool bag large enough to transport vials with an icepack.  Ensure SCIg vials are not in direct contact with the ice, to avoid possible freezing.

scig tickTake SCIg home immediately and place in a sealed container in the central part of the refrigerator.

  • Storage temperatures are dependent on product choice - your nurse specialist will tell you how to store the SCIg product you are using. However, the following principles should be followed for all SCIg products:

scig tickStore SCIg in original packaging until needed, and protected from light

scig tickStore SCIg between 2°C and 25°C and avoid extreme temperatures.   

scig crossDo not freeze (never store SCIg below 2oC) and do not use SCIg that has been frozen.

scig crossDo not store SCIg in the door or bottom storage unit of the refrigerator.

scig crossDo not store SCIg near the cold outlet from freezer to refrigerator (in combination freezer-refrigerator).

scig crossDo not shake SCIg.

If you have a power or refrigerator failure and are unable to keep SCIg refrigerated:

  • Contact your nurse specialist as soon as practical for further advice.
  • If fridge is still cold, keep your supply in the fridge.
  • If the fridge is no longer cold, place SCIg in your transport cool box or cool bag with an ice pack.

Product from a vial is for single use only:

  • Once opened, use as soon as possible as the product does not contain preservative.
  • If you are unable to complete your infusion within the recommended time (which varies between 2 and 4 hours for different products), any unused product should be discarded.
  • All SCIg vials must be disposed of in the sharps container provided by your hospital. These should be returned to the hospital or pharmacy. Do not discard SCIg in your household bin.

SCIg Products

SCIg Product - Hizentra®

  • Once removed from the refrigerator, store Hizentra® between 2°C and 25°C and use up until expiry date.
  • Hizentra® is a clear, pale yellow to light brown solution. Do not use if the solution is cloudy or contains particles.
  • Hizentra® infusions to be completed within 4 hours of starting infusion.
  • For instructions go to https://www.nps.org.au/medicine-finder/hizentra-vial

SCIg Product - Evogam®

  • Once removed from the refrigerator, store Evogam® between 2°C and 25°C and use within two weeks.
  • Evogam® is a clear, pale-yellow to light brown solution. Do not use if the solution is cloudy or contains particles.
  • Evogam® infusions to be completed within 4 hours of starting the infusion.
  • For instructions go to https://www.nps.org.au/medicine-finder/evogam-solution-for-injection

SCIg Product – CUVITRU®

  • Can be stored between 2ºC and 25ºC. Does not use after the expiry date.
  • CUVITRU® is a clear and colourless to a pale yellow or light brown solution. Do not use if the solution is cloudy or contains particles.
  • It is advised that CUVITRU® infusions be completed within 2 hours of starting the infusion.
  • For instructions go to https://www.nps.org.au/medicine-finder/cuvitru

Checking SCIg vials before an infusion

All SCIg vials should be checked for the following prior to an infusion:

  • Expiry date on the vial - DO Not Use if out of date
  • Protective cap is in place - DO Not Use if seal is broken
  • Solution in vial is clear - DO NOT USE if solution is cloudy, discoloured or contains particles

Contact your nurse specialist if any of the above happens.

If unwell, pregnant or breastfeeding

Contact your doctor or nurse specialist for further advice if:

  • If you are unwell with a fever
  • If you suspect you are pregnant, or if you are breast feeding.

Your doctor and nurse specialist will work with you to develop a plan for who, how and under what circumstances you will need to contact someone if you or your child have an adverse reaction.

SCIg and vaccinations

Some immunisations may not be required while on SCIg.  Discuss this with your doctor.

Travelling with SCIg

ASCIA SCIg travel planTravelling with SCIg requires planning well beforehand. A dose of Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIg) before you travel may be a convenient alternative option.

For shorter periods of travel, you may give the SCIg doses due as extra SCIg infusions before and after the trip. 

Speak to your doctor or nurse specialist for advice well before travelling, especially overseas, as you may require an export permit.

When planning a trip:

  • Get a travel plan or letter from your nurse specialist or doctor and take this and your treatment plan in your hand luggage.
  • When flying, take SCIg with you on the plane in your hand luggage and don’t forget to collect it before you leave the plane. It must not be put into checked-in luggage
  • It is important to keep SCIg at an appropriate temperature for your product at all times (check product information, and if uncertain check with your nurse specialist). Never store SCIg below 2°C or above 25°C.
  • Pack pain medication and a non-drowsy antihistamine in case of adverse reactions.
  • Pack enough consumable equipment
  • Pack enough SCIg for the trip and store this in original packaging until needed, in a cool box or cooler bag.

Managing side effects of SCIg

Swelling side effects SCIgCommon reactions at the injection site include mild or moderate  swelling (egg sized lump), ‘hardness’, blanching and redness at the infusion site. These local reactions are normal and short lived (usually gone by the next day). They are more common in people who have just started SCIg, especially in the first few months.

Using the same site for SCIg infusions can help to reduce the amount of local swelling and redness that can occur after an infusion.  Over time, the skin will “get used” to the repeated infusions, and local reactions will lessen.  Most people start to notice a decrease in local reactions after about 8-10 weeks.

If an injection site reaction occurs:

  • Do not rub or scratch the site. Apply gentle massage and warm or cold pack (according to your personal preference) to reduce discomfort. Report unusual site reactions, such as extreme pain or discomfort, blistering or spreading redness to your nurse specialist.
  • Record site reactions in the infusion diary.
  • Refer to the table on the next page for different ways to manage reactions/problems at the infusion site.

Management guide for SCIg infusion site reactions and problems

Site Issue

Possible Cause/s

Management Options

Redness

Common reaction, which usually settles over 24 hours.

If redness is excessive:

  • In some cases it may be due to an allergy or sensitivity to tape. 
  • Needle may not have been inserted correctly or needle may be too short.
  • If it does not cause discomfort, do nothing.
  • Warm or cold pack for short periods may help with discomfort
  • Wrap warm/cold packs in a cloth - do not apply directly to the skin
  • Slow the infusion rate if uncomfortable
  • Try using an over the counter non-drowsy antihistamine
  • Check correct needle placement/length with your nurse specialist
  • Consider alternative tapes/dressings to secure needle/s with your nurse specialist

Swelling

Common reaction, which usually settles over 24 hours, resulting from the amount of fluid being infused underneath the skin (amount of swelling should relate to the volume being infused).

  • If it does not cause discomfort, do nothing
  • A warm pack for short periods may help with absorption.
  • A cold pack for short periods may help with discomfort, but delays absorption 
  • Wrap warm/cold packs in a cloth - do not apply directly to the skin
  • Take a walk to help with absorption
  • Check correct needle placement/length with your nurse specialist
  • May need to decrease volume at the site, reduce the rate or change the infusion site. This should be discussed with your nurse specialist

Itching or burning

  • Incorrect needle placement
  • Incorrect needle length
  • Irritation from tape
  • Ig at needle tip, causing skin irritation
  • Do not scratch or rub
  • Check needle placement and length
  • Try using an over the counter non-drowsy antihistamine
  • Consider alternative tapes/ dressings to secure needle/s
  • Apply cold pack for short periods - wrap pack in a cloth - do not apply directly to the skin
  • Discuss dry priming with your nurse specialist

Pain with infusions

  • Incorrect needle placement
  • Incorrect needle length
  • Infusion going too fast
  • Check needle placement/length
  • Apply cold pack for short periods - wrap pack in a cloth - do not apply directly to the skin  
  • Slow infusion rate
  • Try simple pain medication (such as paracetamol) before starting the infusion
  • Take a walk to provide a distraction
  • Check tape placement for pulling on skin or body hair
  • Discuss with your nurse specialist

Blanching (whiteness)

Normal tightening of tissue that can occur as SCIg infuses into the fatty tissue under the skin.

  • Do nothing, usually goes away on its own when the fluid is absorbed
  • Warm pack for short periods (may assist absorption) - wrap pack in a cloth - do not apply directly to the skin

Leaking from the infusion site

  • Incorrect needle insertion
  • Incorrect needle length
  • Amount of volume infused at the site
  • Check needle insertion
  • May need to consider changes to volume, needle length or rate of infusion.
  • Speak to your nurse specialist or doctor.

Management guide for SCIg reactions 

© ASCIA 2021

ASCIA is the peak professional body of clinical immunology and allergy specialists in Australia and New Zealand  

Disclaimer

This document has been adapted with permission from resources developed by Princess Margaret Hospital Immunology Department (Department of Health, Western Australia). It has been peer reviewed by ASCIA members and is based on expert opinion and the available published literature at the time of review. Information contained in this document is not intended to replace medical advice and any questions regarding a medical diagnosis or treatment should be directed to a medical practitioner. Development of this document is not influenced by commercial organisations.

Content updated July 2021

Mod ASCIA Member
Donate to AIFA
go to NAS website
ASCIA Member Login
ASCIA Update

Information for the community about allergic diseases, immunodeficiencies and other immune diseases.
See latest edition here...
Join our mailing list:

About ASCIA

ASCIA is the peak professional body of clinical immunology and allergy in Australia and New Zealand
ASCIA promotes and advances the study and knowledge of allergy and other immune diseases

Quick Links

About ASCIA

ASCIA is a registered trademark of the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy. All content is subject to copyright for the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy. Read more...

The content for the website is developed and approved by ASCIA Committee and ASCIA Working Party Members. Read more...

Disclaimer I Privacy

The ASCIA website is intended for use by ASCIA members, health professionals and the general public. The content provided is for education, communication and information purposes only and is not intended to replace or constitute medical advice or treatments. Read more...

ASCIA respects your privacy. Read our privacy policy here...

Sponsors | Advertising

ASCIA does not endorse products from sponsoring organisations, nor is it influenced by sponsoring organisations with regard to the content of education programs and websites. 

The ASCIA website does not accept advertising. Any link to a third-party website does not imply any endorsement by ASCIA.

Accreditiation

healthdirect

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.